Trending in Employee Benefits

Trending in Employee Benefits

Attracting the best employees is always at the top of any businesses to do list, keeping those employees is usually a very close second. Employers have long known that employee benefits package makes all the difference in attracting top talent. However, there have always been huge disparities over what exactly those packages should include and which employees should be included in the offer.

Required Benefits

  • Social Security
  • Workers Compensation
  • Unemployment Insurance

Expected Benefits

  • Health Insurance
  • Limited Life Insurance
  • Retirement Plan

These benefits are traditionally included in most packages, and employees have come to expect that they are just there. Employees don’t really think about these benefits unless they are presented with a package that does not have these basic employee benefits. When asked, employees offer up a rather surprising wish list of benefits that may actually save an employer large sums per employee.

10 Most Wanted Employee Benefits:

  1. First Place is actually a tie
    • More Flexible Health Insurance, that includes Vision and Dental – Side Note: the most favored options for more flexible health insurance was actually not a traditional insurance plan at all. Instead, many employees would rather have on-site health care than a traditional insurance plan that they must navigate themselves and use precious sick days and vacation time to use.
    • More Flexible Work Hours, including work where you are options
  2. More Paid Vacation Time
  3. More Paid Sick Days, including Mental Health Days
  4. Student Loan/Tuition Assistance
  5. Paid Maternity and Paternity Leave
  6. Free On Site Fitness/Yoga/Gym Memberships
  7. Free On Site Child Care
  8. Free Drinks and Snacks
  9. Company Wide Retreats and Outings
  10. Team Bonding Events

Based on this Employee made list, it is safe to assume that most workers actually want their employer to offer the things that make them happier, healthier, more productive employees and that keeps them engaged with the workplace as much as possible.

That’s great news for an employer that wants the best out of each person they hire. It also offers up what can seem a daunting challenge to employers. Now it is squarely on the employer’s shoulders to discover and offer strong benefit package options that are far outside the traditional and make these benefits work just as hard for the company as they do for employees.

The time has come to step outside the comfortable standard business practices box. Discover, for example, how an on-site clinic lowers company wide health costs and keeps your employees working by immediately addressing small problems before they become major illnesses while keeping the employee away from their job for minutes or hours, instead of days. The possibilities are endless no matter how big or small a company. Which ones will you institute today to ensure the best employees are at each station of your company?

About Tantam Health

Tantam Health specializes in onsite clinics, worksite clinics and nearsite clinics. Their innovative programs, advanced reporting capabilities, and unique structure of their team allows them to deliver customized solutions that exceed their client’s expectations. The company takes a team-based approach to their worksite healthcare delivery model, adhering to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) guidelines set forth by the NCQA. Learn more at www.tantamhealth.com

I Challenge You to try Hiring Differently

I Challenge You to try Hiring Differently

It’s very comfortable and common for a hiring manager to search for specific skill sets when hiring for a position. Hiring managers are most likely to try to find someone with specific experience in the role and skills needed for the role. For example, in the veterinary field it is common for managers to search for veterinary assistants whom have already held the role elsewhere and already have the technical skill set for the job.

If you are one of these managers, it’s time to step out of the box and be more creative with your choices. I challenge you to choose your next hire based on talent not skill set. What do I mean by this exactly? People can be taught skills and learn new things, of course at different paces, but it is not necessarily a talent to have a learned technical skill.

If you are choosing people based on previous experience in the same role or technical skill set alone, this can back fire easily. Sure, you may think they don’t need as much training because they’ve done the job before, but this is not usually the case. These individuals often already have “their way of doing things”. They’ve learned the skills a certain way, believe that is the best way and are less willing, if not unwilling, to change the way they do things. They need to be re-trained to understand the culture and meet the standards of your company and are often not as engaged in doing so.

This is in stark contrast to someone with talent but little technical skill set. People with ‘talent’ are generally hardworking, driven, and willing and able to quickly learn new things. Many times you find these people either just out of school or coming from a different industry, which leaves them at a disadvantage when it comes to skill level. But, as one of my favorite quotes goes, “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities. In the expert’s mind there are few.” They may not be able to immediately perform every function of the role, but you are able to develop them and mold them into exactly what you are looking for. The skills can be taught, but ‘that something’, that drive and excitement for learning and leading cannot be taught.

I can tell you from personal experience that hiring for talent works out in the long run. I once hired a barista to be a veterinary assistant. She had absolutely no veterinary skills or experience, but she had talent. She was (and still is) confident, a born leader, a driven and hard working person that was (and still is) eager to learn new things and be a part of something bigger. She applied and interviewed for a front desk position, but immediately upon interviewing her and seeing her with the team, I knew she would pick up the skill set needed to work in the clinical environment of the hospital and be a leader while doing it. She quickly learned the necessary technical skills, got comfortable with the team and began leading the day to day work of others. She was recently promoted to a hospital lead position, and I have no doubt that she will keep growing.

If you happen to come across someone with both skills and talent, then of course go for it. But if you ever have the choice between skills/experience and talent, always, always, always pick talent! I promise you won’t regret it.

Written By: Jamie Ozga, CPO at Tantam Health, Inc.

About Tantam Health

Tantam Health specializes in onsite clinic, worksite clinics and nearsite clinics. Their innovative programs, advanced reporting capabilities, and unique structure of their team allows them to deliver customized solutions that exceed their client’s expectations. The company takes a team-based approach to their worksite healthcare delivery model, adhering to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) guidelines set forth by the NCQA. Learn more at http://www.tantamhealth.com

Do you hire Employees or Associates?

Do you hire Employees or Associates?

I remember working for a company and moving up the ranks pretty quickly. My input was requested in making hiring decisions not only for our company, but also for the clients we served. How exciting was that?! As I referred to the client’s employees as “associates” I was quickly corrected. They were employees, not associates. I took the feedback and nodded my head with understanding. In reality, I didn’t understand. Are they employees or associates, I couldn’t yet articulate what it was. I also started to question which one I was, which one I wanted to be, and what I would accept.

An employee is generally referred to as someone who provides labor to another person or a company. That’s it. So basically, an employee is an individual contributor that seeks a wage in exchange for labor.

An associate, in contrast to an employee, is a person united with another or others in the business. The key work being ‘unity’. When you are working towards a common goal (to complete business) in a unified group there is equality despite the title of each person in the organization.

The difference between being an employee or associate is really about working individually for a wage or working in unison towards a common purpose.

This revelation got me thinking about turnover rates. Do some company’s struggle year over year with retention because they don’t understand their culture? Are they hiring collaborative individuals and sticking them on an assembly line? Are really focused/introverted people being forced into uncomfortable group projects?

Through a lot of my own soul searching, I discovered that I am an associate. I need purpose and want to work with a team that is all striving toward one common goal. As referenced earlier, not everyone needs collaboration to feel engaged. Some people prefer to be an employee- they prefer to work in peace, within their cubby providing quality work to their manager. There is a need for both employees and associates, but there is also a greater need to hire the right one for your organization.

As an organization, it is important to ask yourself this one question before you make your next hire- do you hire employees or associates?

About Tantam Health

Tantam Health specializes in onsite clinics, worksite clinics and nearsite clinics. Their innovative programs, advanced reporting capabilities, and unique structure of their team allows them to deliver customized solutions that exceed their client’s expectations. The company takes a team-based approach to their worksite healthcare delivery model, adhering to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) guidelines set forth by the NCQA. Learn more at www.tantamhealth.com

Breaking Down the Barriers in Worksite Clinic

Breaking Down the Barriers in Worksite Clinic

I’ve been in countless worksite clinic meetings, presentations, trade shows and webinars over the years and one of the common themes that discussed is how complicated our healthcare system is. The question almost always comes to us, what is being done to break the communication barrier between all of the healthcare groups that exists?

Within the scope of the worksite clinic industry, we’ve seen a lot of positive traction with more and more vendors adopting a team based approach through the patient centered medical home model. Other support factors such as the influence of technology within the scope of the practices. This has lead to a switch in the industry with the focus now being on the patients. All parties working together as a team to provide much higher quality of care in addition to increased coordination of care across the healthcare spectrum.

Although barriers are coming down through this team based approach, there still is room for improvement as worksite clinic providers. We must avoid putting up our own barriers between the clinics. Implementing a clinic and not properly supporting the clinical staff over a relatively short period of time, significantly reduces the effectiveness if the clinicians are operating on an island by themselves.

The clinic management company must take careful consideration to all aspects of their practice to prevent these barriers from going up. These items include, but are not limited to:

  • Hiring a Strong Team
  • Create a Culture of Collaboration & Engagement
  • Supply Initial & On-Going Training
  • Provide Resources for Support
  • Back Office Support Resources (Account Manager, Case Management, Data Analytics Team, Etc.)
  • Encourage the Clinical Staff to Have a Voice
  • Financial Incentives – Clinical Team

Preventing these barriers from going up will lead to amongst others a high quality, efficient, effective and ever evolving worksite clinic.

About Tantam Health

Tantam Health specializes in onsite clinics, worksite clinics and nearsite clinics. Their innovative programs, advanced reporting capabilities, and unique structure of their team allows them to deliver customized solutions that exceed their client’s expectations. The company takes a team-based approach to their worksite healthcare delivery model, adhering to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) guidelines set forth by the NCQA. Learn more at www.tantamhealth.com

Are Your Clients Stuck With You?

Are Your Clients Stuck With You?

We all know sales & marketing bring new business, but service providers face slightly different challenges. When you are selling services, there are no physical products or even a prototype to show. Although, clients do their due diligence in selecting a service provider and most seek professional help from consultants, there still lies a big risk of ‘will this vendor perform to the standard in which they sold to us?’

This ‘fear’ makes the sales cycle harder and longer, but like every other company who wants to succeed, everyone places their best foot forward and tries to win the business.

A normal sales cycle for a service provider may include the following steps:

  1. Prospecting a lead,
  2. Finding the right lead,
  3. Nurturing that lead,
  4. Connecting with the lead,
  5. Introduction & Initial presentation,
  6. Request for a proposal (depending on the complexity of the industry, this can take days to weeks),
  7. Revisions of the proposal,
  8. Presentation and implementation offerings,
  9. Negotiations and Approval,
  10. Closing the deal.

An incredible amount of work went into winning this business, but what now? Well, for a service provider, the real work starts now. You have to deliver the level of customer service, technology, communication, engagement, utilization and ROI that you promised during the sales and presentation process.

From the client’s perspective, they have trusted you with their investment of time and money. They believe that their lives will be much easier since you are on-board and offering your service, but they become ‘stuck’ when you start to do the following:

  1. Not delivering what you promised,
  2. Not delivering on time,
  3. Not thinking through what is needed before it is needed,
  4. Start losing the people in your team,
  5. Lastly, and the worst of all, start blaming the clients for your weaknesses.

The client brought you on expecting the results that you overpromised and under delivered and are subsequently stuck. Your poor performance directly impacts their image in the industry, their image for their executives, board members and peers.

There are 3 ways to ensure your clients never feel “stuck”:

Don’t promise clients what you know you can’t deliver

If you believe in your services, skills and talent and you can deliver what will make you proud and your clients super happy, there are enough clients looking for just that. Listen to your clients and know what they are looking for before you say ‘yes’ to everything.

Do the damn work

Winning business is half the battle. Delivering the service and continuously offering the best quality service becomes instrumental in winning more new business. Your new business may bring contract renewals and a reference for future business opportunities. Take care of your clients’ needs and it will come back to you in multiples.

Take care of your team

When in the service industry, 99% of the time you are selling your team’s talents, their ability to perform, their commitment to deliver and their dedication to YOUR clients. In other words, your team is your product. Take care of the team!

About Tantam Health

Tantam Health specializes in onsite clinics, worksite clinics and nearsite clinics. Their innovative programs, advanced reporting capabilities, and unique structure of their team allows them to deliver customized solutions that exceed their client’s expectations. The company takes a team-based approach to their worksite healthcare delivery model, adhering to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) guidelines set forth by the NCQA. Learn more at www.tantamhealth.com

My First Hire Almost Killed My Team

My First Hire Almost Killed My Team

I was a new manager at a relatively busy hospital. Fresh out of training at another site, I had not spent much time with my team yet. My only direction out of training was to hire, and hire quickly. I found a seemingly qualified applicant named Dennis. He had years of experience in the industry and had stayed several years at a couple locations. Dennis interviewed well and even showed up on time in a three piece suit. He answered all questions, an offer was sent off and an acceptance was quickly received.

I could not shake the feeling that he wasn’t quite “right” but I had no basis to believe that was true- until he called off on his first day. There was a family emergency. The team rolled their eyes and I explained that sometimes things happen at the worst times and asked them to think positive. During his first few weeks, Dennis showed up late for work in bleach stained scrubs, his movements were slow, his attitude towards training was mediocre at best and he always had some life event that was more important than him showing up for his team.

I watched my ambitious and efficient top performers becoming increasingly silent as they carried his weight. The other team members used the name “Dennis” as a joke. Through the silence of the team, there were consequences: breaks started to last longer, tardiness started to surface. I sat Dennis down and explained where his performance was falling short and the effect it was having on the team. Yes, he was part of a TEAM, not an individual contributor. He accused me of not being sensitive to him being a young step-father and for not having compassion for his situation (though I had privately given him transportation money from my own pocket and the job he didn’t seem to want). We parted ways.

There are a couple things that I learned:

Find what is missing in your team

It is important to know what stage your team is in before placing an ad. Have they all worked together for years and the thought of training someone with little industry experience might excite them? Are you so understaffed that someone with little experience might further burden them? Is your whole team introverted and cliquey? How might an extroverted social butterfly fit into the mix? It is important to think about what is missing in the team to further engage the existing team. How does this new hire compliment the strengths or challenge the team toward positive growth?

Think about what was really said

The “not quite right” feeling that I felt when I reflected on Dennis was intuition. I realized later I listened to everything that he said, but ignored how he said it. I heard the tone change, the quiet hesitation in the responses and I saw the change in body language or eye contact but my decision was made on the words he said. He chose the correct answers and said everything that I needed to hear. I have since hired many applicants after Dennis and have really learned to listen to everything except the words coming out of an applicants mouth. When I look into their eyes, do I trust them? When I watch their hands, are they nervously excited or lying? Trust your gut.

Make the cut

If you did everything right and were just fooled (which happens to the best of us), do not be afraid to get rid of the problem. After you are sure that you have exhausted all coaching and support opportunities, do not waste another moment on this hire. Your other hires need you and you are only one person. Your team will grow weary of supporting under performers and they will lose confidence in your leadership, authority and trust that you have everyone’s best interest at heart. Cut out the tumor and watch your team grow.

Written by: Kristina Dillard – COO at Tantam Health

About Tantham Health:

Tantam Health specializes in onsite health, worksite clinics and nearsite clinics. Their innovative programs, advanced reporting capabilities, and unique structure of their team allows them to deliver customized solutions that exceed their client’s expectations. The company takes a team-based approach to their worksite healthcare delivery model, adhering to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) guidelines set forth by the NCQA. Learn more at www.tantamhealth.com